Recipes: Three ways to cook shrimp for dinner

The earthy sweetness of shrimp pairs with the mild heat of Fresno chilies in our take on camarão a moçambique, or shrimp Mozambique. Despite the name, the dish is in fact Portuguese — Mozambique was once a Portuguese colony and is the source of the piri piri chilies traditionally used to spice up the shrimp. For our version, we opt to use an easier-to-find fresh Fresno chili combined with sweet paprika to add color and mild heat.

Let the shrimp cook undisturbed after adding them to the pan; not stirring for a few minutes gives them time to brown and build flavor. Also, take care not to undercook the garlic. It should turn golden so its flavor is sweet and toasty.

1½ pounds jumbo shrimp, peeled, deveined, and tails removed, patted dry

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

6 medium garlic cloves, minced

1 large Fresno chili, stemmed and sliced ​​into thin rounds

½ cup dry sherry

2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus lemon wedges, to serve

¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro

½ teaspoon white sugar

Crusty bread, toasted, to serve

In a medium bowl, toss the shrimp with the paprika, ¾ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes.

In a 12-inch nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat, warm 1 tablespoon of the oil until barely smoking. Add half the shrimp in an even layer and cook, without stirring, until deep golden brown on the bottoms, 1 to 2 minutes.

Stir and cook until opaque on both sides, another 20 to 30 seconds. Transfer to a medium bowl. Repeat with 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil and the remaining shrimp.

Wipe out the skillet and return it to medium heat. Add 4 tablespoons of the remaining oil, the garlic, and the chili. Cook, stirring frequently, until the garlic is golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in the sherry and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes.

Off heat, stir in the lemon juice, cilantro, sugar, and remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil. Return the shrimp and any accumulated juices to the pan and stir to combine. Transfer to a serving platter and serve with toasted bread and lemon wedges.

Cantonese Shrimp With EggsConnie Miller/of CB Creatives

Cantonese Shrimp With Eggs

Makes 4 servings

Cantonese Shrimp With Eggs is typically made as a stir-fry in a wok, but we found that a nonstick skillet is well suited to the task. Instead of Chinese chives, which are traditional, we use an entire bunch of scallions for savory, oniony flavor and vibrant green color. To turn this into a complete meal, serve with steamed rice.

When you sear the shrimp, cook them just until they turn pink, which ensures they stay plump and tender. If browned, their texture will be tough and rubbery.

12 ounces jumbo shrimp, peeled, deveined, and tails removed, halved crosswise and patted dry

Kosher salt and ground white pepper

8 large eggs

2 tablespoons dry sherry, divided

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

3 tablespoons grape-seed or other neutral oil, divided

1 bunch scallions, white parts finely chopped, 4 scallion greens thinly sliced ​​on the diagonal

2 finely grated fresh ginger teaspoons

In a medium bowl, stir together the shrimp, ¾ teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon white pepper. Let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes. In another medium bowl, whisk the eggs, ½ teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon white pepper, 1 tablespoon of the sherry, and the sesame oil.

In a 12-inch nonstick skillet set over medium heat, warm 1 tablespoon of grape-seed oil until barely smoking. Add the shrimp in an even layer and cook until pink on the bottoms, about 1 minute. Flip and cook until the second sides are pink, another 30 to 60 seconds. Stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon sherry and cook until almost evaporated, about 20 seconds. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Wipe out the skillet.

In the same skillet set over medium heat, add the remaining 2 tablespoons grape-seed oil until barely smoking. Add the scallion whites and ginger, then cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. For the eggs into the center. Using a silicone spatula, continuously stir the eggs, pushing them toward the middle as they set at the edges and folding the cooked egg over on itself. Cook until almost set, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the shrimp and cook, stirring constantly, until the eggs are just set. Divide among warmed serving plates and sprinkle with scallion greens.

Trinidad pepper shrimpConnie Miller/of CB Creatives

Trinidad Pepper Shrimp

Makes 4 servings

Chinese immigrants began to arrive in Trinidad in the early 19th century. Trinidad Pepper Shrimp, a stir-fry that pairs fruity habanero chili with ginger and soy sauce, is a result of the Chinese influence on the local cuisine. Ketchup may be an unexpected ingredient, but it is traditional and gives the sauce a welcome sweetness and glaze-like consistency.

Take care not to sear the shrimp until they’re fully cooked. The goal is to brown them for flavor; they’ll finish cooking when they’re added back to the skillet at the end. Also, don’t overcook the vegetables; they should retain some color and crunch to add visual and textural appeal to the stir-fry.

If you like, serve with lime wedges and steamed rice.

1½ pounds jumbo shrimp, peeled, deveined, and patted dry

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

3 tablespoons grape-seed or other neutral oil, divided

1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger

2 teaspoons soy sauce, divided

1 medium carrot, peeled and thinly sliced ​​on the diagonal

½ medium red onion, sliced ​​½-inch thick

1 poblano chile, stemmed, seeded, and chopped into ½-inch pieces

8 medium garlic cloves, minced

1 habanero chile, stemmed, seeded, and minced

1/3 cup ketchup

Chopped fresh cilantro or sliced ​​scallions, to serve

Season the shrimp with salt and pepper. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat, warm 1 tablespoon of the oil until barely smoking. Add half the shrimp in a single layer and cook, without stirring, until golden brown, about 45 seconds. Stir and cook until pink and opaque on all sides, another 20 to 30 seconds. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat with 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil and the remaining shrimp. Add the ginger and 1 teaspoon soy sauce to the shrimp in the bowl; toss to combine.

In the same skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat until barely smoking. Add the carrot and onion and cook, stirring once or twice, until lightly charred, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the poblano, garlic, and habanero, and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add ½ cup water, the remaining 1 teaspoon soy sauce, and the ketchup. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is thick enough that a spoon leaves a trail when drawn through it, 2 to 4 minutes.

Remove the skillet from the heat. Stir in the shrimp and any accumulated juices, then cover and let stand until the shrimp are opaque throughout, 2 to 4 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve sprinkled with cilantro.


Christopher Kimball is the founder of Milk Street, home to a magazine, school, and radio and television shows. Globe readers get 12 weeks of complete digital access, plus two issues of Milk Street print magazine, for just $1. Go to 177milkstreet.com/globe. Send comments to magazine@globe.com.

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