Salmon-Challis National Forest reports 1 new fire

SALMON, Idaho (KIFI) – The Salmon-Challis National Forest has had one new fire in the last week.

To date, there have been 44 wildfires reported on the Salmon-Challis National Forest. 36 of those reported fires are out.

Elkhorn Fire (September 18): The fire, located approximately 27 miles northwest of Salmon on the North Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, is estimated at 0.10 to 0.25 acres. The fire is burning in grass and dead/down fuels. A storm cell passed over the fire area yesterday afternoon, fire managers will do a reconnaissance flight of the fire area today to gather more information. Further information will be shared if significant activity occurs.

Saw Log Fire (September 10): The fire, located approximately 22 miles northwest of Challis on the Salmon-Cobalt Ranger District, is estimated at two acres. The fire, burning in timber with a litter understory is 100% contained.

Horse Fire (September 8): The fire, located approximately 5½ miles northwest of Corn Creek on the North Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness is estimated at 397 acres. The fire is burning in lodgepole, fir, and snags. The fire is being managed under a point protection strategy. Fire activity is minimal. The fire can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8416/.

Owl Fire (September 8): The fire is being updated separately and can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8416/.

Siah Fire (August 17): The 11 acre lightning fire, located approximately six miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The fire burning in grass, brush, and fir is out.

Norton (August 1): The lightning fire is located approximately seven miles northwest of Lower Loon Creek on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The 9,054 acre fire burning in subalpine fir, Douglas fir, sagebrush, and grass is located in steep rugged terrain. Fire activity has moderated due to recent precipitation over the fire area. The fire is under a point protection strategy, fire managers are utilizing air resources to determine action points and assess values ​​in the vicinity. Fire managers continue to assess the fire using remote cameras and aircraft. The fire can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8308/.

Moose (July 17): The fire is being updated separately and can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8249/.

Woodtick (July 14): The lightning fire started as two separate fires approximately six miles west, northwest of Meyers Cove on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The 9,598 acre fire burning in timber, grass, and brush is located in steep rugged terrain. Fire activity is minimal, the fire is smoldering and creeping. The fire is under a point protection and confine and contain strategies with risk to responders and public safety being the top priority. The fire can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8253/.

Wolf Fang Fire (July 13): The lightning fire is located approximately four miles northeast of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the North Fork Ranger District. The 2,082 acre fire burning in spruce and fir is located in steep, rugged terrain. Fire activity is minimal, the fire is smoldering. Risk to responders and public safety are the top priorities for the Wolf Fang Fire. Due to the inaccessibility of the terrain and snag hazards, Middle Fork Peak lookout, a remote camera, and aviation are assessing the fire daily. The fire can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8273/.

The forest is asking visitors to be aware of the VERY HIGH fire danger for the Salmon-Challis National Forest. The US Forest Service, Idaho Department of Lands, and Bureau of Land Management in east-central Idaho are in Stage 1 fire restrictions. Stage 1 fire restrictions apply to federal, state, state endowment, private forestland and rangelands within the designated area. One Less Spark Means One Less Wildfire.

Nationally, there are 24 uncontained large fires being managed under a full suppression strategy and 81 large fires managed under a strategy other than full suppression. For information on smoke visit: https://fire.airnow.gov/.

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